Cancer Awareness Dates for Fall 2015

Right now, the sun is bright and the temps may be sweltering, but fall is just around the corner. As you pull out those trunks of sweaters and shop for kids’ back-to-school supplies, don’t forget that fall is also a season full of awareness events for important causes.

(Click Here to Download the Cancer Ribbons pdf)

Make note of these important dates now so you don’t miss the chance to contribute to these important awareness initiatives! Follow the links to learn more about each cause and what you can do to spread the word.

September

Childhood Cancer Awareness Month
The loss of a young life is utterly heartbreaking. And yet, relative to other causes, childhood cancer is often pushed aside from the limelight, and research is largely underfunded.

Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month
This initiative focuses on the five types of cancer to women’s reproductive organs. All women are at risk, and that risk increases with age.

Leukemia and Lymphoma Awareness Month
Both cancers of the blood and bone, these two cancers are responsible for an estimated 21,000-plus deaths each year, according to the American Cancer Society.

National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
Perfectly in line with Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month, this initiative focuses specifically on cancer of the ovaries.

National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
Men’s cancer issues need awareness, too. Prostate cancer is complex and has many subtypes.

Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month
In 2014, the Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association, Inc., announced a record number of 62,980 thyroid cancer diagnoses.

October

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Possibly the most popular awareness initiative of the season! But this important cause still needs your support.

There are several one-day events connected to this awareness initiative during the month:

  • October 16: National Mammography Day
    Mammographies can catch breast cancer early and save lives. This event lands on the third Friday of October each year.
  • October 13: Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day
    Metastatis is when cancer spreads from one part of the body into others. This is what causes deaths from breast cancer.

Liver Cancer Awareness Month
Cancer of the liver is the fifth most common type of cancer in the world.

November

Lung Cancer Awareness Month
The Lung Cancer Alliance expects this year’s initiative to include over 125 events in three continents.

National Stomach Cancer Awareness Month
With almost a million new cases of stomach cancer diagnosed each year, it’s the second leading cause of cancer death, according to No Stomach for Cancer.

Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month
In the United States, the five-year survival rate for pancreatic cancer is just six percent.

Fall is a busy season with many good causes to get behind. Take a little time to explore each, and spread the word to help others do the same. Together, we can all learn more, prevent and reduce the impact of cancers of all kinds, and save lives.

Learn Fundraising 101: The Basics

Fundraising can be a daunting business, but you can make it easy if you break it down into the basics.

 

Why Fundraise?

Fundraising is an important part of life. To a certain group of people, species of animal, area of the planet, or otherwise – your mission matters. Raising money for your mission will have a very tangible impact on the existence of those that it targets.

The main point of fundraising is to raise funds for something that we need, for bills that need to be paid or to fund projects that need to be undertaken. If your group doesn’t raise this money, then who will? Fundraising is also a fantastic way to fulfill your group’s objectives, to offer something into your community and to raise awareness for your cause.

Many people have developed a cynicism about fundraising, but it’s important to remain clear about the reasons why this fundraising is important, and to maintain your conviction over what this money will mean for your cause. Fundraising enables groups and organizations all over the world to serve the planet in very important ways. Fundraising provides shelters and meals for the homeless, funds research for cancer, keeps school and churches open and provides medical aid for people living in third world conditions. Organizations that rely on donations can’t survive without fundraising – without it, much of the good work in the world would simply cease to exist.

 

Planning Your Fundraiser

An important thing to keep in mind is that successful fundraisers do not create themselves. They take work, time, commitment, passion and often monetary resources.

While some groups are natural cash generating machines, others need to learn the skills that make fundraising efforts successful. The good news is that good fundraising can be done by anyone who has the drive to make it happen– it just takes some planning!

The planning that goes into any fundraiser is going to be crucial to the success of the campaign. Every fundraiser that takes place, whether big or small, needs to have a concise, coherent plan written down which covers aspects of who/what/where/when and how. The success of your fundraiser will be a direct result of how much careful planning went into it.

 

Choosing a Team

Crucial to planning a fundraiser is having a dedicated team of people to plan it.

As early as possible, your event will need a committee dedicated to the fundraising event. This may be the same committee that works on other things within your organization or it may be a select group of people who are focused on the fundraising itself. These people will be responsible for contributing, and delegating substantial effort to the fundraising goal and to the event, or events, surrounding the fundraising.

 

Money Matters

Ensure that your fundraising has a goal set. You need to decide on what amount of money you plan to raise with your fundraising. Factors to take into account will be how much money your group needs to satisfy its immediate needs, how many people you estimate to attract, what expenses will have to come out of this amount and how much time you will have to raise the money. Whatever the amount, make sure that everything in your fundraising plan is driven towards raising this specific amount of money.

Ensure that your fundraising also has a budget in place. This should include all of the expenses that will be required to carry out your fundraising, right down to the pen you will need for signups. Make sure that the budget includes expenses on the day, marketing and promotional materials and payment for people that are not volunteers. Ensure that it also takes into account your fundraising goal, and that you will raise well above the amount of outgoings. You might also want to leave a little ‘wiggle room’ for unforeseen expenses that come up along the way.

 

Choosing How to Fundraise

Your fundraising committee will need to think about which events will take place, and what methods will be used to source money.

Will you;

  • Ask via telephone?
  • Ask face-to-face?
  • Ask via email or direct mail?
  • Hold an event?

When deciding how best to  approach fundraising, (BTW, here’s 100 fundraising ideas), several things should be taken into account, including;

  • Who is the target audience?
  • What would provide good visibility?
  • What would garner good attendance?
  • What resources are available?
  • How many people will be available to help out?

Once your committee has settled on the means of fundraising, a plan can be written up including all of the details. This plan will need to include basic details like location, date and time, as well as everybody’s roles, so that every person involved knows ahead of time what their responsibilities are.

Once this plan is in place, it’s time to promote, promote, promote!

 

Marketing

Now that everything is in place, you will need to aggressively market your fundraiser.

The fundraising team will need to decide how to show your organization’s current supporters and the general public why your fundraiser is worth their valuable time and money.

Firstly this will involve getting the word out amongst those you know. Sales and marketing professionals know that a warm hand is always better than a cold one. The same rule applies in the world of fundraising. The closer people are to you and your organization, the more likely they are to contribute to your cause when asked to. Make sure that everyone involved in the project is actively talking to their friends, families, neighbors and social networks, ensuring that everyone they know is aware of why this fundraising is important, and what difference it will make to the community. Once this is done, begin reaching out to the wider networks: local businesses, neighborhood contacts, people from other organizations that are relevant or linked to your own and any others who may share your organization’s concerns and feel moved to contribute.

Your community will be full of people who have money to give, and we cannot always predict who these people will be. Your most important ingredient in marketing is getting the word out there. If people don’t know about your fundraiser, then they can’t contribute anything towards it.

 

After the Money Has Been Raised

The importance of thanking people cannot be overstressed. Each and every contributor, no matter how big or small their donation, must be thanked. Before the fundraising committee folds, be sure that gratitude is expressed to everyone who was involved in the fundraising. This can be done via email, direct mail, phone or by a small event or gift to say thank you (just be sure to include this in your expense budget). And don’t forget your volunteers.

It’s quite simple: if you want people to put in the time and the money next time, you need to keep them happy.

 

shutterstock_238214992Last Minute Things

A few valuable tips to remember:

  • The best fundraisers are the ones that offer something for everyone. Think about what you can offer as part of your fundraising that will benefit your contributors. If a fundraiser looks like a mutually beneficial offer, you have a better chance of people giving over their hard-earned cash for it.
  • Good planning will be the make-or-break factor in any fundraising. The more you put into it, the more you will get out of it. Successful fundraisers do not happen if volunteers are not willing to get off the couch and make it happen.
  • Fundraising is about far more than ‘money-making’. You want your fundraiser to create long-term relationships with people that will create awareness about your organization and its mission, as well as generating supporters that will become contributors at later fundraising events. Ultimately your fundraiser should be successful in the short term, generating the funds that you need for your project, as well as building your brand and database in the long term.

Another “Back to School” Giveaway (This is Over, Sorry)

teacher's-give-awayHey Teachers,

We’re picking a winner tomorrow at Noon!

Tag a ‪#‎teacher‬ in the comments BELOW, for a chance to win a $50 Amazon.comGift Card. Winner will be chosen at random and announced on Friday July 24th at Noon EDT ‪#‎backtoschool‬ ‪#‎giveaways‬

Want More Special Offers for Teachers?

Most Popular Summer Runs for Breast Cancer Awareness

Every two minutes, another woman is diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States, according to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. The good news is, there’s tons of ways to show your support and help raise funds, so we can all fight back to reduce the number of breast cancer victims. One of the best ways to do it is with a race.

Races raise funds while also inspiring people to get in shape and enjoy the outdoors—an especially great goal in these sunny summer months!

Whether you want to walk a few miles or take on an extreme fitness challenge, there’s a race out there for you. Here are some of the most popular summer races for runners and walkers who want to get moving in support of breast cancer:

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk
As the largest network of breast cancer awareness events across the nation, it’s likely that at least one of the 300 annual event locations is somewhere near you. These noncompetitive three- to five-mile walks are an uplifting experience focused on community and support. By participating, you can help breast cancer patients and support education and prevention efforts.

AVON 39
This two-day, 39.4-mile walk isn’t kidding when it describes the race as a challenge. But AVON promises that along the way, “you’ll crush fear, doubt and breast cancer.” Not a bad trade-off for one weekend of effort. This summer, races will take place in Boston, Chicago and San Francisco, with even more walks coming to additional locations across the country throughout the year.

Susan G Komen 3-Day
Branded as “the journey of a lifetime” and “the biggest thing you can do to help end breast cancer forever,” the three-day walk organized by Susan G. Komen is much more than a race—it’s a 60-mile, soulful retreat. Many who have made the journey attest to the incredible bonds they forge along the way. If you want to fight breast cancer and gain inspiring connections along the way, this one’s for you.

Race for the Cure
If you’re looking for a faster pace or shorter time investment, try Susan G. Komen’s Race for the Cure 5K run/walk. The popular race has been around for over 30 years and has grown to include over a million participants each year across four continents. The race welcomes people of all fitness levels, and has locations all over the country.

Tough Mudder
If you want to go all-in for an extreme fitness challenge, sign up for one of the Tough Mudder 10-12-mile obstacle courses. It’s not specifically affiliated with a breast cancer organization, but you can make sure your registration supports one by registering to run for Breast Cancer Care.

A Run for Every Style
Regardless of your pace, goals and fundraising style, there’s a breast cancer race out there for you. Along the way, you’ll make new friends, get in better shape, and enjoy the sunny summer weather. When you run to support breast cancer or other causes, everybody wins.

Help Your Special Needs Children Get Back to School

The back-to-school season can be a rough transition for any child—especially when they’re headed for a new school. But when your child has special needs, a new environment can cause extra anxiety.

Fortunately, there’s plenty you can do to prepare your special needs child for a new school now to lessen your child’s stress when that first class bell rings.

Talk About It
It’s important to discuss the new school and any feelings caused by the change with your child. Let them know they’re not alone—it’s normal to feel nervous when making a big change like this, and even to feel sad if there are old friends they won’t see every day anymore.

But also talk about the positive opportunities ahead—a new school is an opportunity to learn new things and meet new friends. By focusing on the positive, you can help your child ease anxieties and get excited.

Get Teachers On Board
It’s also a good idea to talk to the teachers and support team that will help your child at the school, if possible. Take advantage of these conversations to make expectations and needs for your child clear up front, and establish a line of two-way communication to remain open throughout the year, so that you can your child’s teachers can work together for your child’s interests throughout the year.

Explore Early And Often
Do all you can to familiarize your child with the new environment early – play on the playground, walk the halls, and spend time in the classroom if possible. Return to these spaces frequently in the weeks before school starts so they become familiar for your child.

Much less overwhelming when the halls are crowded and bustling that first day if they already know how to get from their locker to home room.

Get On Schedule
If the new school’s schedule will require significant changes to what he or she is used to—such as getting up significantly earlier—why not transition to that schedule a few weeks ahead of time? By reducing the amount of change he or she faces on that first day of school, you can make the overall experience easier.

The anticipation of a new school can be intimidating for anyone, and for special needs children in particular. But there’s a lot you and your child can do before the year starts to reduce the challenges and stress. Take these proactive steps now and help your special needs child take on their new environment more confidently.

 

100 Fundraising Ideas

When you are tackling a fundraising project – no matter how big or small, it’s always best to hold several different kinds of events so as to appeal to as many people as possible. You also want to take the time to choose the best events for your fundraising, and plan them out as best you can, to make sure that you get as much as you can out of each event.

Fundraising can be a tough job, and it often takes several different events to raise the money needed for your project. That’s why we have compiled this list of fundraising ideas for you to make the most of!

Here’s our list of 100 Fundraising Ideas!

  • Basket raffle
  • Hold a yard sale
  • Bachelor or bachelorette auction
  • Bake Sale
  • Bake-off
  • Lessons with a volunteer teacher
  • Board game tournament
  • Quiz night
  • Theatrical production
  • Bucket street collection
  • Butler auction
  • Fun run
  • Car washing
  • Spelling Bee
  • Car detailing
  • Photo/portrait sessions
  • Babysitting
  • Silent auction
  • Charity Ball
  • Singing benefit concert
  • Orienteering
  • Charity breakfast
  • Bring your dog to work
  • Pet show
  • Can drive
  • Cookbook
  • Car smash
  • Computer smash
  • Craft fair
  • Dinner auction
  • Eating contest
  • Face painting
  • Christmas Gift wrapping
  • Hair shaving
  • Marathon
  • Karaoke night
  • Kissing booth
  • Fashion show
  • Tea party
  • Yard work
  • Hire a hubby auction
  • Movie night
  • Calendar
  • Pajama day
  • Art show
  • Pet parade
  • Remembrance tree
  • Pie in face
  • Country fair
  • Rent-a-puppy
  • Event parking
  • Santa letters
  • Trashin’ fashion show
  • Weight loss challenge
  • Beauty pageant
  • Guess the number of jellybeans in the jar
  • Casual dress day
  • Walk-a-thon
  • Bag groceries
  • Dog walking
  • Winter bazaar
  • Carnival day
  • Battle of the bands
  • Dance-a-thon
  • Working bee
  • Cheese rolls
  • Swim-a-thon
  • Bingo night
  • Plant sale
  • Produce stall
  • Book sale
  • International dinner
  • Classic car show
  • Pumpkin decorating contest
  • Debate evening
  • Talent night
  • Comedy night
  • Flower show
  • Fitness tournament
  • Mini Olympics
  • Poetry and book reading
  • Tug of war
  • Tombola
  • Makeovers and manicures
  • Henna hand art
  • Lemonade stand
  • Barbecue lunch
  • Pancake breakfast
  • Gourmet cooking class
  • Singing telegrams
  • Block party
  • ‘Who Dunnit’ murder mystery party
  • Window washing
  • Event glow sticks
  • Rent-a-worker
  • Pamper evening
  • Teddy bear’s picnic
  • Stadium seat cushions
  • Tupperware party
  • Food Festival

We hope you enjoyed this list. Feel free to comment letting us know which ones are your favourite, and which ones helped you raise the most funds for your cause!

Staying Out of the ER During Heat Waves

Summer is usually a season for fun in the sun. But when the heat gets extreme, it’s anything but.

Heat waves can cause serious health risks that can put you in the emergency room or even cause death. But fortunately, there is a lot you can do to reduce the impact of heat waves on your health.

 

Stay cool and safe during heat waves with these tips:

Stay Informed
Pay attention to weather forecasts each day so you know what temperatures to expect, and what the heat index will be. With this knowledge, you can plan appropriately for the weather. 

Keep An Emergency Kit
In case of a power outage, an emergency kit ensures you have what you need to get by. This list from the American Red Cross will keep you and your loved ones ready for this and many other emergency situations.

Avoid The Heat
Limit your activity outside as much as possible, especially during peak heat hours in the middle of the day. Try to spend your time in the coolest and lowest parts of your house, such as the basement. Keep your curtains and blinds closed to keep the sun out.

If you don’t have air conditioning at home, find places that do where you can spend time during the day, such as libraries, schools, community centers, or malls.

Reduce Outdoor Activity
If you must work outside, keep your activity low and take frequent breaks. Always work with someone else, and drink plenty of water—at least two to four eight-ounce glasses per hour.

Avoid drinks that dehydrate, especially beverages which include caffeine or a high sugar content.

Dress For The Heat
Wear clothing that will help you stay cool—loose, light-colored garments. It’s better to cover your skin rather than expose it, as it protects you from sunburn and encourages perspiration, which will keep you cooler. Outside, wear a hat and sunscreen.

Never Leave Children In Vehicles
It’s never safe to leave a child in an enclosed car, but it’s especially life-threatening during a heat wave. Leaving a child in an enclosed car during a heat wave could kill him/her. This also applies to pets.

Know The Symptoms
Signs of heat exhaustion include headaches, nausea, dizziness, muscle cramps and excessive sweating. If a person starts exhibiting these symptoms, move him/her to a cooler place to rest. The person should drink something with electrolytes, such as a sports drink, fruit juice or milk.

Don’t ignore these symptoms! If left untreated, the person’s condition can escalate to heat stroke, which can cause organ failure, comas or even death.

If you observe signs of heat stroke—including an extremely high temperature, redness on the skin, changes in consciousness, a rapid and weak pulse, shallow breathing, vomiting or seizures—call 9-1-1. 

Taking Precautions Can Minimize The Impact
The intensity of summer heat waves push the human body beyond its capabilities. They are a serious threat that can lead to health risks, expensive emergency room bills, and even death.

Fortunately, if you take the precautions seriously and protect yourself and your loved ones, you can minimize the impact of a heat wave on your summer fun.