How the School Library Promotes Independent Learning

Although school libraries’ role is shifting in the digital age, they are still a critical resource for students in fostering the skills for independent learning.

The Internet has changed how information is consumed, and some have even questioned whether libraries still have a role in the modern school system. However, libraries have and continue to adapt, offering critical support for student success. In fact, a well-equipped and staffed library is a key differentiator of the most successful schools.

Libraries continue to be important for student success because they don’t just offer access to books and resource materials—they also help students become independent learners.

 

What is Independent Learning?

As defined by Brightside, independent learning is “when an individual is able to think, act and pursue their own studies autonomously, without the same levels of support you receive from a teacher at school.”

In other words, independent learning is the ability to learn on one’s own, without outside support.

 

Why Does Independent Learning Matter?

When a child becomes an independent learner, limits on their education begin to dissolve. An independent learner is free to discover new books and pursue what they are curious about, from bugs to baseball to why the sky is blue.

This can, in turn, reinvigorate the learning process for students, even in the classroom, and turn them into lifelong learners who will continue to grow and learn long after they graduate.

These are critical life skills that will help their grades in school, their job performance in adulthood, and overall life enrichment.

 

How do Libraries Support Independent Learning?

To start, libraries offer access to a wide range of books and materials, both print and digital. Studies have shown that students are better, more avid readers when they have a wide range of engaging materials available to them.

Perhaps even more importantly, librarians help students become critical researchers. Mainstream search engines tend to produce results based on what a person has searched for and clicked on in the past. This means that search results reaffirm the searcher’s bias. But a school librarian can help students learn to apply strong research methods, evaluate the quality of provided information, and seek out balanced resources.

In a digital world, these are important skills not just for the classroom, but for life.

 

A Skill Set to Get Ahead

An independent learner is motivated, curious, and able to overcome challenges. These are qualities that would serve every child well and help them reach their potential. School libraries have a big role to play in developing this skill set in children, and schools can help their students get ahead by supporting them.

Music As Therapy: The Healing Power Of Music

For ages, people have turned to music to get excited, calm down, share experiences, and more. Over time, scientific research has shown that this natural affinity for tunes is much more than a feeling—music can have powerful healing qualities.

Music therapy applies those scientific findings to enhance music’s power and help people heal to improve their physical, emotional, mental, social or even spiritual well-being.

Many different groups have been shown to benefit from music therapy, including:

Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
Music therapy has been shown to improve social behaviors, boost focus, reduce anxiety, and even enhance body awareness and coordination for people with ASD, as detailed in a study in Journal of Music Therapy.

Oncology patients
Music therapy can enhance the quality of life of oncology patients in many ways, including by reducing pain and anxiety, boosting mood, and improving heart rate and blood pressure. Cancer.org cites a review of studies reflecting these impacts, and music therapists are part of many cancer management teams.

Soldiers with PTSD
Veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) gained an opportunity to better express and control their feelings and build a sense of connectedness through improvisation on hand drums, as cited in this Huffington Post article.

Special needs children
Most children engage with music quickly, so it can serve as a strong motivator to encourage kids with special needs to make requests, develop motor skills, and complete challenging activities. This post from Friendship Circle shares how.

Alzheimer’s patients
For dementia patients, an aptitude and appreciation for music is one of the abilities that stays with them the longest. Music can be used to improve patients’ mood, manage stress-induced agitation, encourage positive social engagement, and prompt cognitive functioning, according to Alzheimers.net.

Individuals with depression
For people suffering from depression, music can provide a catharsis and much-needed way to connect with others through joint improvisation. Creating music also enables people to positively experience their physical being. These are critical elements of depression recovery, as explained in this BJPsych article.

For pain management
Music provides sensory stimulation that causes patients with chronic pain to relax, reduces stress, boosts their mood, and reduces the patient’s perceived pain level. As explained by Everyday Health, patient learns to relax automatically while listening to music with practice.

Combining the Art and Science of Music

These are only some of the ways music therapy is improving lives. When the art and science behind music combine, they create a powerful therapy technique that can stimulate and heal us, both body and soul. With thousands of certified musical therapists in America today, many different kinds of patients experience the healing powers of music each year.

Ways to Relax

Let’s face it, life is busy. Sometimes it catches up with us, leaving us feeling stressed and overwhelmed. When this happens, you need a way to fight back.

Fortunately, even just a few minutes can be enough to help you recharge. Here are 26 ways to relax.

  1. Breathe
    Take 5 deep breathes, give it your full attention, notice the pause but in and out.
  2. Write
    Journaling about your feelings can help relieve them.
  3. Be grateful
    Write a list of what you’re grateful for—nothing is too small.
  4. Make a plan
    Knowing what you need to do today (and what you don’t) can help relieve the stress.
  5. Play
    Adults can sometimes forget how to play, but anything that is purposeless and pleasurable and help us unwind.
  1. Use visualization
    Whether you’re really standing at the ocean or just imagining it, your brain responds the same way.
  1. Talk to someone
    One of your best tools for coping with stress are social connections.
  2. Go green
    Immersing yourself in nature can help you unwind. Go for a walk along the river or find a good bench under a tree.
  3. Sleep on it
    It may feel counterintuitive, but take 20 minutes and catch some zzz’s. It can refresh your mind, while the brief time frame keeps you from getting groggy.
  4. Change the tunes
    Listening to upbeat or calming music can quickly shirt your mood.
  5. Meditate
    Even a few minutes can ease anxiety, especially when practiced daily.
  6. Be present
    Stop your thoughts and take a minute to be present in your body to be aware of it.
  7. Warm up
    Place a warm compress over your neck and shoulders for 10 minutes, lean back, and close your eyes to relax those tense muscles in your face, neck, and back.
  8. Laugh out loud
    Reduce your levels of stress hormone cortisol and increase feel-good endorphins with a good laugh.
  9. Stare at the ceiling
    Tilting your head up lowers blood pressure and slows your breath. Count down slowly from 60 while doing this to help still your mind.
  10. Set your worries aside
    Write down all of the things that are causing you stress, then put them aside to deal with tomorrow.
  11. Sip green tea
    Green tea has L-Theanine in it, which helps relieve anger.
  12. Go dark
    With some dark chocolate. A single square (1.4 oz) can regulate your cortisol levels.
  13. Chew gum
    The repetitive and thoughtless nature of chewing gum can reduce anxiety within just a few minutes.
  14. Count down
    This simple action demands enough attention to stifle the sources of your stress.
  15. DIY a hand massage
    Hands carry a lot of tension, so stop wringing your hands and massage them instead.
  16. Grab a golf ball
    But forget the irons. Instead, roll it against the bottom of your feet to release tension.
  17. Squeeze it out
    On a stress ball. They didn’t become a common desk tchotchke by accident.
  18. Get some sun
    Take a quick walk outside and soak up some rays to lift your spirits.
  19. Practice yoga
    The smooth deliberate motion of yoga is great for calming and re-centering.
  1. Cuddle with a pet
    A good snuggle with a furry friend is a proven way to de-stress.

Nausea: When To Seek Medical Advice

Nausea is very common symptom that is associated with a wide range of health conditions, referring to the physical discomfort that gives a person the feeling that they may be about to vomit.

Often the cause of vomiting or nausea can be determined fairly easily by looking back at a person’s recent actions (such as a particularly stressful day, or that gas station sushi s/he ate for lunch). But there are times when nausea and vomiting are very serious.

Knowing how to recognize when it’s time to see doctor can be the difference between a quick recovery and a life-threatening situation.

What’s serious enough to warrant a doctor or ER visit depends on age and condition. Here is a breakdown of what warning signs to look for by group:

Children
When a child is nauseous, the most common causes are overeating, motion sickness, blocked intestines, milk allergy, viral infections, food poisoning, or illness with a high fever. Another common cause is dehydration, particularly for those too young to communicate the symptoms.

If a child is nauseous and vomiting, look for these signs that s/he needs to seek emergency treatment:

  • Vomiting lasts longer than 24 hours, or longer than 12 hours for infants under 2
  • S/he shows symptoms of dehydration (dry lips, drymouth, sunken eyes, rapid breathing or rapid pulse)
  • S/he hasn’t urinated for longer than six hours
  • S/he is confused or lethargic
  • S/he has a fever of 102°F or higher for children 6 or older (100°F for infants)
  • Any infant with both vomiting and diarrhea
  • Any time an infant has projectile vomiting
  • If a child has vomited continuously for more than two hours
  • S/he hasn’t been able to keep liquids down for eight hours

Adults
When an adult feels nauseous, it’s usually easy to determine the cause—motion sickness, food poisoning, a virus, or emotional stress are common triggers.

Most of these causes are not serious, and pass within a matter of hours. But there are times when it is important to seek emergency treatment. On occasion, extensive vomiting can serious damage the esophagus.

An adult should seek medical treatment if:

  • S/he suffers from nausea for more than seven days
  • S/he shows signs of dehydration
  • She suspects she could be pregnant
  • If there is a known injury such as a head injury or infection
  • If vomiting continues for more than 24 hours
  • Blood is in the vomit (red or something appearing like coffee grounds)
  • If the person experiences a stiff neck or headache
  • S/he is lethargic, confused or lacking alertness
  • S/he has abdominal pain
  • S/he is unable to eat or drink for 12 hours

Pregnant women
Nausea is common during pregnancy, especially early on. However, frequent vomiting can lead to hyperemesis gravidarum, a condition in which a fluid and mineral imbalance develops. This is a serious medical condition that can endanger the fetus.

If this nausea is affecting a woman’s everyday life, it’s worth discussing with a doctor, but if an expecting mother experiences any of these, she should seek medical attention right away:

  • She vomits several times a day
  • She is unable to eat or drink without vomiting
  • She is losing weight

Cancer patients
For cancer patients undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, nausea is very common. Patients should be aware of associated risks including dehydration and choking, and always call your cancer team in the following situations:

  • The patient may have inhaled some of the vomit
  • S/he vomits more than three times an hour, for longer than three hours
  • Blood, red, or a coffee grounds-like substance appears in the vomit
  • S/he can’t eat for more than two days, or can’t consume more than 4 cups of liquid or ice chips for more than one day
  • The patient cannot take his/her medications
  • S/he shows signs of dehydration
  • S/he loses two pounds or more within 48 hours or less

Know the Signs and Risks

Most of the time, nausea is not a serious health threat, and it generally passes within a matter of hours. But nausea is a symptom for a wide range of conditions, from anxiety to a concussion.

While some of the most serious causes of nausea are rarer, there are some situations in which a nauseous and vomiting individual requires immediate medical care. Know the signs to keep you and your loved ones safe, and when in doubt, seek assistance.

Is Facebook Good For Your Health?

Is Facebook good for your health? It’s a big question, and as social media continues to become more and more prevalent, an important one.

According to a 2013 study by Facebook and IDC, smartphone users check Facebook as much as 14 times a day. Any time an action becomes habitual and compulsive like this, it starts to take on traits of addiction, affecting our daily lives.

So how is all this posting and profiling affecting us?

A lot of research has been dedicated to exploring this question—and the results are conflicting. Depending on the study or article you pick up you could find two disparate answers to this question: yes and no.

Hazards of posting

A number of studies have shown that the amount of time we invest in Facebook and other social media can take a toll on our psyches and detract from our overall happiness.

A study published by the American Academy of Pediatrics used the term “Facebook depression” to refer to a condition found to occur in tweens and teens who spent too much time online. The condition was correlated with increased substance abuse, unsafe sexual practices, and aggressive or self-destructive behaviors in the study subjects.

However, correlation is not causation, so Facebook’s role in triggering the condition has yet to be proven. Furthermore, the article cited a second study that indicated youths with quality friendships weren’t subject to “Facebook depression,” indicating that the quality of a teen’s social connections are a significant factor.

Another study by Israeli researchers found that the more time adolescent girls spent on online, the more likely they were to develop an eating disorder.

Other studies focused on adults have come to similar conclusions.

For example, Facebook has been found to factor into the divorce rate, and posts are even used by lawyers as evidence during divorce proceedings.

Studies have found that Facebook can trigger marital dissatisfaction in multiple ways, from reigniting relationships from long in the past, to serving as a forum to air dirty laundry. The strain these behaviors place on a relationship can lead to divorce.

Spouses who check in on their partner’s page may invite jealousy if they see something they don’t like, and that can lead to conflict. In “Facebook and your Marriage,” it’s recommend spouses discuss what’s fair game for posting and what’s not.

But Facebook’s impact on our quality of life stretched beyond the status of our marriages. It can also influence our overall life satisfaction.

A study from University of Michigan and Leuven University checked in with people five times a day asking about their mood and social interactions, both online and off. The results aren’t good for social media—the more times a person had checked Facebook since their last questionnaire, the worse their mood was on the next one.

Perhaps that’s because, as a joint survey from Germany’s Humboldt-Universität and TU Darmstadt showed, the most common feeling associated with Facebook browsing is envy.

As we browse more and more of what look like perfect lives flow through our feeds, it can cause us to develop a skewed perspective of our own lives. This leads to anxiety, discontent, and in some cases depression or eating disorders.

In short, Facebook can exacerbate our insecurities, push them further, and isolate us in our time of need.

But there’s a silver lining

Despite these negative findings, it may not be time to swear off social media quite yet. The detrimental effects of Facebook are real, but they’re not necessarily the full story.

A study from Cornell University showed that when a person updates their Facebook profile, they get a boost of self-esteem associated with being proactive about the image they project to the world.

Contrary to findings that social media isolates individuals with depression, another study from Michigan State University indicated that people with low self-esteem and happiness levels felt more connected to friends and their community when they logged onto Facebook more frequently. Another study from Lancaster University showed that high use of Facebook helps cement friendships among 21- to 29-year-olds.

Another study by Pew Research Center showed that people who use Facebook frequently score higher on test measuring companionship and emotional support.

So what’s the real answer?

Which studies are giving us the real story? It may simply come down to how we choose to use Facebook, rather than inherent qualities of the network itself.

The Humboldt-Universität and TU Darmstadt  study showed that how a person engages on Facebook may be at least as important as how frequently they use it. In the study, those who used Facebook primarily to browse were more likely to experience negative effects than those who used it to communicate.

To protect your well-being while using Facebook and other social media, try to use it mindfully by managing your emotions and actions when you log in. focus on connecting with friends and loved ones, and avoid behaviors that lead to negative emotions like stalking old flames, comparing your life to the appearance of others’, and inundating yourself with media images flaunting impossible beauty standards.

In short, remember why you log in to Facebook in the first place. Pay attention to how it makes you feel, and don’t be afraid to take a break or change how you use it.

Does An Apple A Day Really Keep The Doctor Away?

Just as the age-old adage promises, it seems an apple a day really can keep the doctor away.

Apples (along with other fruits and veggies) pack a combination of vitamins and minerals that out-power supplements like artificially made vitamin capsules. These nutrients are critical for our bodies’ health—not only do they keep our immune system strong to fight off germs, but they also reduce our risk for heart disease and cancer.

Doctors believe the reason fruits and vegetables are so much better for our bodies than the bottled stuff is because supplements delve out nutrient one at a time, but the combination of many different nutrients found in natural sources like apples offers added benefits.

So while no amount of apple-eating can guarantee you’ll stay clear of the doctor’s office completely, it’s a great place to start.

Do Strong Libraries Boost Student Achievement?

In a time when budgets are tight, every aspect of education is assessed for its value, and school libraries are no exception. Do school libraries contribute significantly to student achievement?

Research into the answer to this important question dates to the 1960s. And for just as long, a strong correlation has been found between library resources and student success.

Here are seven research findings that reflect the importance of libraries for student achievement:

  • Studies in the early 1960s found a correlation between elementary schools with centralized school libraries staffed by certified school librarians, and increased average test score gains. An ever-growing body of research has backed up her findings since.
  • A study of schools in Colorado showed that students had better reading scores on standardized tests when they had access to a school librarian, even after controlling for outside factors like poverty.
  • In a 2004 assessment of existing research, a correlation was found between access to good libraries and children who read more and performed better on reading tests. This was particularly true in areas of poverty, where libraries are often children’s only access to books.
  • In a 2003 comparison of schools with and without librarians, students at high schools with a librarian performed an average 8 percent better in reading achievement, and students at elementary schools with a librarian performed 35 percent better.
  • The more time librarians spent collaborating with teachers, taught information literacy, and provided in-service teacher training, the higher students scored on tests, according to a 2000 study.
  • When teachers collaborate with librarians, they were three times more likely to rate their literacy program as “excellent,” in a 2009 study.
  • A study of third, fourth and fifth graders showed that students with a full-time librarian had 4-5 percent higher scoring proficiency. These schools also had a lower number of students who scored “unsatisfactory” by 2-3 percent absolute difference. (The same results applied for programs with one and a half FTE library staff.)

Because every school system, body of students, library, and librarian is a little different, assessing exact impacts of a given program on students can be complicated. But even across many different assessments over many different years and across several different states, the correlation between school libraries, trained librarians, and student success remains consistent.

The bottom line is clear: Strong libraries make for stronger teachers and stronger students.

School Libraries: Adapting to the Digital World

Libraries may be traditionally thought of as buildings were books are kept, but in a digital world, libraries are changing to become much more. As libraries evolve to the Information Age, they are taking on completely new models that focus on different kinds of resources and spaces.

However, the goals of libraries—especially school libraries—remain the same: to support students to learn, discover and become critical thinkers throughout their lives. In this goal, libraries are becoming even more relevant than ever.

A New Kind of Collection

Many believe that, with such an abundance of free information now available online, library collections are becoming irrelevant. But nothing could be further from the truth.

Libraries have always collected books, but the modern library is about more than paperbacks. Print books continue to be important, but collections of resources in alternative formats are becoming popular, too. Much more than just ebooks, these collections may include anything from infographics, to tweets, to digital images. These are important for students to learn who to use and interpret in today’s society.

But books still matter, too. In fact, a diverse and engaging collection of books is a top differentiator for helping children to read more frequently, enjoy reading more, and develop better literacy skills.

More Collaborative Spaces

The student spaces inside libraries are looking differently these days, too.

Libraries are incorporating new methods like Learning Commons (mixed-use spaces for research, study and collaboration) and Makerspace models

(areas within libraries focused on production and production tools like 3D printers and graphics software). Sometimes they even include brainstorming areas and café-style configurations with flexible furniture and devices.

In a world where students often study together, learn from each other, and must complete projects together, these new spaces are designed to encourage collaborative learning.

Critical Researching Skills

The most important thing in a library isn’t the books—it’s the librarians.

Librarians are an invaluable resource for both students and teachers—they are the all-important connection between people and information. Librarians are advocates for reading, learning and critical research practices.

Understanding how to be a critical researcher has become more important than ever in the digital age—while it’s easy to look up anything we can imagine on search engines, their algorithms are designed to provide links based on what we have searched in the past, which reaffirms our existing biases.

Librarians play a very important role in teaching students how to discern the quality of the information they find, and how to ensure their research is balanced. As Common Core puts an emphasis on research skills, learning these complexities about the content we engage with has become closely tied to student success.

An Emphasis on Flexibility

Internet access has become increasingly important for student success. And yet, 25.6 percent of American households do not have Internet access at home (according to the 2013 U.S. Census).

School libraries play an important role in bridging the gap. The traditional, fixed library scheduling approach offers students library time as part of a pre-scheduled block of class time. However, more libraries are starting to use flexible scheduling options that open the library to students to come use its resources any time they want. When libraries can be flexible and creative to offer students greater access to its resources, student success increases.

Creating Strong Creators

Students have been consumers of information in libraries for as long as they’ve existed; but in the digital age, it’s increasingly important for students to become creators of content, too. Libraries can play an important role in helping students learn how to use important tools for creation, as well as how to think as a content creator.

A Vital, Evolving Resource

Although libraries’ collections, schedules and physical spaces are evolving significantly, one thing remains the same: Libraries are a vital resource for students and our communities at large. Libraries continue to offer students important resources and play a major role in shaping growing minds.

Making the Library a Space Children Want to Be

Libraries can play an important role in children’s lives. They are a safe place to spend time and discover the joy of reading.

Libraries are also spaces for community—places to play and discover, imagine and inspire, learn and study, and even take some much-needed quiet time.

But children won’t flock to the library just because it’s good for them—like any space for children, a library needs to be inviting, engaging and fun.

How can libraries rise to the challenge? Here are some tips to create library spaces that will have children excited to explore:

Organize the space into zones

Libraries are pretty big spaces, especially from a child’s perspective. To make them more inviting, break it into smaller “zones” of space focused around different functions and activities.

This can create the illusion of smaller spaces while introducing more variety, which will engage children better. Remember, cultivating the right environment within a library can be just as important as cultivating its collection—so be sure to give it the consideration and forethought to make the space useful and inviting.

Think interactive

For children, play time is a highly engaged learning opportunity. The more stimulating the activity is, the more their minds develop.

Help kids get the most out of their play by creating engaging, multi-sensory experiences for them. Look for ways to enhance play experiences within the library with ways to stimulate kids’ sense of sight, smell, touch and sound.

Design for many different needs

In addition to having several zoned spaces available with multi-sensory experiences, it’s also important for those spaces to meet a variety of needs. Children need spaces where it’s safe to be highly active as much as they need spaces for quiet time. They need spaces for interaction as much as they need spaces to be alone in. Create a variety of spaces that meet these varied needs for different age groups.

Consider making spaces flexible with furniture that is easy to move around, so kids can create their own spaces, too.

Get on their level

This tip applies both literally and figuratively.

On a practical level, a children’s section of the library should be accessible to children—that means keeping shelves lower so that kids can find and look at books on their own. It also means providing furniture and spaces that are made specifically for children of various age groups, so they are comfortable as they enjoy the library.

But it also means thinking creatively to find fresh ways to engage young imaginations. Be playful and whimsical with how you decorate the walls, arrange the shelves and set up displays!

Start small

For libraries just starting to modify its space to better engage children, don’t worry about trying to do everything at once. Start small, and focus on the quality of experiences rather than how extensive they are.

As a starting place, consider identifying a need that could be addressed with the creation of a space zone, or an bring in a local expert for an activity.

Fundraising Myths

To some, fundraising can seem impossibly difficult; to others, overly simple. But if you fall into either of these categories, it’s likely you’ve fallen prey to some of these common fundraising myths.

Don’t let assumptions about fundraising hold back your organization’s success. Check your assumptions against these common fundraising myths.

 

Donors Already Want to Give
When you live and breathe your non-profit, it’s hard to see how anyone would not want to give immediately to your cause. But that’s because you’re front and center to witness how big the problem is, and how big an impact the non-profit’s work makes.

Your target audience of potential donors most likely has no idea, and may never have even heard of your organization before. So never go in assuming your donor wants to give—be prepared to start at the beginning and prove the impact a donation will make.

 

Donors Only Give for Selfish Reasons
It’s common marketing advice to take a donor-centric approach in your fundraiser messaging. But don’t confuse this with a lack of generosity.

Neuroscientists have shown that making donations lights up the reward center of the brain, which means people enjoy donating. Respect that showing donors how their gift makes an impact, which helps make a personal, direct connection between the act of donating and the positive impact that donor makes.

 

Corporations Give the Most Money
Contrary to this myth, an article in Slate cites a drop in corporate giving over the past corporate years, while individual giving remains steady. This impression comes from the fact that major corporate donors get lots of visibility from the non-profits they support in the way of name-dropping and “sponsorship” call outs.

But that’s just because when a corporation donates, they’re doing it to bolster their image—in a way, they’re indirectly paying for the promotion the non-profit will give them. This doesn’t make corporate giving any less good, but it’s important to bear in mind when planning a fundraising campaign. 

 

Everything you Say has to be Packed with Emotion
It can be wise to use emotion to motivate donors to give to your cause. However, be wary of how much you use it. Relying too much on emotion can feel overly sensational to readers. Don’t forget to balance your emotional content with statistics, factual content, and background information.

 

Online Fundraising isn’t as Good as Offline Fundraising
Online campaign efforts, historically, have not brought in the same amount of donations as other types of campaign outreach. But when these campaigns were given a closer look, it became clear that this discrepancy was due to an underinvestment in online campaigning, not the medium itself.

When they given an equal effort, online fundraising can be just as effective as other marketing methods—if not more so! Just look at the impact of ALS’s 2014 Ice Bucket Challenge, which raised over $100 million.

 

A Form Letter is as Good as a Personal Ask
Consider how easy it is to receive a piece of direct mail and toss it right into the trash without so much as reading it. Now, think about how motivating it is when someone comes to you and asks you personally for your help.

Even fundraising pros dread the discomfort of approaching an individual and making a request for a donation in person. But it’s still the best way to rally people to support your cause.

 

Fundraising is a Science
Actually, this myth is true. A wealth of information is available through professional trade publications and websites, based on scientific research and studies. Use it to stay informed about the latest methods and strategies.

But beware—don’t confuse the scientific principles of fundraising with mechanical, automated execution that doesn’t take creativity or strategy into consideration.

 

For Fundraising, Make No Assumptions

Perhaps because it’s personal, or perhaps because it’s challenging, fundraising has a lot of different stigmas and assumptions around it. Regardless of the reasons for it, being aware of what’s fact and what’s fiction will give your organization a leg up on reaching its fundraising goals.